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Asking the Names

Asking the Names

By Michael Miller

Including his debut poetry collection with the Ashland Poetry Press, The Joyful Dark, Michael Miller has published seven other collections. This latest publication includes heartfelt selections that reflect on aging and longstanding relationships, plus a section which pays tribute to patients at Water Reed Military Medical Center.


Life As It

Life As It

By Daneen Wardrop

"Life as It proves Daneen Wardrop's mastery of voice. In these pieces, the past, present and future coalesce in bright bursts, and, through juxtaposition and accumulation, the connections become ever more compelling, and beautiful, and edgy, and interesting as they unspool. This is poetry of both narrative and musical accomplishments, and a book one won’t forget." - Laura Kasische


The Genome Rhapsodies

The Genome Rhapsodies

By Anna George Meek

The Genome Rhapsodies opens with Gregor Mendel’s question: “What is inherited, and how?” Like strands of DNA, the syntax in these brilliant and moving poems intertwines with the infinitely recombinant moments and utterances that comprise our lives, revealing that what we inherit, first and finally, is language itself... - Angie Estes, 2014 Snyder contest judge


American Urn: Selected Poems (1987-2014)

American Urn: Selected Poems (1987-2014)

By Mark Irwin

American Urn draws from Irwin’s collected and award-winnning works to date, including selections from Against the Meanwhile (1988), Quick, Now, Always (1996), White City (2000), Bright Hunger (2004), Tall If (2008), and Large White House Speaking (2013).


Our House Was on Fire

Our House Was on Fire

By Laura Van Prooyen

Our House Was on Fire is an arresting, beautiful, and deeply satisfying book of longing, yet longing for what can never be known. And that gives this collection its powerful complexity: what is wanted or contemplated is tempting, but impossible. True desire recognizes what one might lose and also what one must give. Much is given in this book, much of the poet’s mind and honest heart. Van Prooyen’s poems offer a celebration, a carefully laid out feast. -- Maurice Manning


Tancho

Tancho

By J. David Cummings

Tancho [by J. David Cummings] is a book that needed to be written and needs to be read. Its account of terrible beauty is itself beautiful, speaking of "hope and despair, the promise of each to other."


Out of Place

Out of Place

By Richard Jackson

His lines are clouds of love, piercing the sky with enormous empathy, rolling in the azure, torrents of passion, and are arrows at the same time, reaching a peak where they break, crying, cleansing the air, becoming ether. It is impossible to describe this in discursive language. With a melody that is unmistakably his own, his poems seem to come to us in Europe from the heart of the heart of America, the totally open (and hidden) center from where the power of the continent sprouts. He is a kind of Scorzese in poetry, but where Scorzese almost succeeds in his films, then stops, seals and terrifies us, Jackson adds a tender, vulnerable voice that blossoms and transforms us and that is so unique and great, great in its truest sense in Richard Jackson's poems. - Tomaž Šalamun


American Psalm, World Psalm

American Psalm, World Psalm

By Nicholas Samaras

"...[Samaras] is a stern and original poet, whose seriousness and morality seem almost foreign, like that of the Turkish writer Nazim Hikmet or Czeslaw Milosz or Pablo Neruda. His poetry combines social and personal intensities, ancient reverberations and American intonations... this is a poetry of beauty and purity, often painterly..." —Liz Rosenberg, New York Times Book Review


Luminous Other

Luminous Other

By Robin Davidson

These beautiful, wise and moving poems live in the shadow of history and art. They inscribe a contingent world where, as the sign above the "Main Street Fire Sale" reads, "New losses arrive daily." In the face of such inescapable loss, the speaker of another poem is prompted to ask the question that haunts all human life: "How can I sing when I know / I will die?" And the answer comes back as another question, the only answer there can be: "When I know I will die, how can I keep silent?" Luckily for us, Davidson can t keep silent; she sings. - Susan Wood


Coney Island Pilgrims

Coney Island Pilgrims

By John Hennessy

"In his new collection, CONEY ISLAND PILGRIMS, John Hennessy does more than catalogue the things of this world; he sanctifies them: bruised strawberries, Kangols, an unleashed pit bull, Puccini's Suor Angelica, rainy afternoons, Big Bird. It's all here, reconstituted in language and forms that do more than lodge a mirror before our mind's eye. These poems are the gateway to a kingdom of rhythmic feeling, linguistic order, and imaginative explorations."—Major Jackson


The Rattling Window

The Rattling Window

By Catherine Staples

The poems in The Rattling Window reveal an imagination caught up in the wondrous ordinariness of simply being, knowing how complicated in fact such simplicity is. Staples manages this magic by the quality of her attention, the articulate, luminous sympathy she brings to whatever her eye takes in. Whether it’s a seashore, a field in winter, the “whiplong honeycomb casing of a snake,” or the astonishing, unforgettable thereness of a horse, it’s all illuminated by this poet’s “bright lines of light.” She speaks of “unearthly singing—just the wind in the ear of a whelk.” Of such singing—bringing the ordinary and the amazing into illuminating alignment—are these poems made. - Eamon Grennan


The Rigid Body

The Rigid Body

By Gabriel Spera

Gabriel Spera tiptoes a fine line, maintaining a balance between formalism and free verse, traditional tropes and verbal originality. When Spera casts his long, clause-riddled sentences into a formal structure, the result is often spectacular. The sentences tumble down through the stanzas like downhill skiers, swerving almost breathtakingly to clip the gate of each rhyme...


Blue Orange

Blue Orange

By Robert Grunst

In Robert Grunst’s poems the city’s forgotten signs rise from memory into mid-day light. Blue Orange conveys the luster of words, revealing both an older and brightened sense of the world. These poems are at once both shrewd and true.


Traction

Traction

By Mary Makofske

Traction is a collection of poetry that repays attention. The poems are intelligent and well-crafted. Makofske ranges widely from moving meditations on prehistory to an homage to Walt Whitman, love poems, family poems, poems about nature, mortality, and growing up in the fifties. These poems are not just for the eye but sound in the ear.


Expedition: New and Selected Poems

Expedition: New and Selected Poems

By Arthur Vogelsang

. . . generated by energetic, unconventional inquiry into all manner of human experience . . . . the sweeping, ironically interrogative aspect of the poems . . . the authoritative, oddly direct original persona . . . . These are dreamlike yet wide awake poems, and they are vulnerable, despite their big-time bravado. They are doors, opening onto new vistas.


Striking Surface

Striking Surface

By Jason Schneiderman

Jason Schneiderman is a sly, dextrous, and in many ways existential poet. Intellect and feeling meet head-on in his work; their collision elicits arresting moments of clarity, of understanding. These poems seem to believe without believing, betraying the depths (always scary) beneath their surface veneer. Sometimes Schneiderman stands naked, as in the breathtaking elegies to his mother. I feel this book has taught me something new about mortality and human need.


Appetite for the Divine

Appetite for the Divine

By Christine Gelineau

In this series of long poems Christine Gelineau brings us the poetry of awakening, perception, birth, and seasons as well as loss, tragedy, and despair and shows that the whole universe beats with one heart (‘the systole-diastole of the cosmos’) as language somehow pursues truth (‘In the absence/ of answers meaning/ may yet find space/ to emerge’) where all things are a tale in themselves. Of the human reaching for understanding she asks questions which only the cosmos can answer: ‘What satiation would Eve have imagined/ as her teeth cleaved the apple?//What were we made for/ if not this appetite for the divine?’”


Resonance

Resonance

By Richard Jackson

It's the combination of soulfulness, intellectual rigor, and a courtly, almost Petrarchian ardor for the beloved that has always fueled Richard Jackson's poetry. They are also poems of dazzling associative vigor--funny, elegic, and political by turns. I wish that more of our poets possessed his big heart and breadth, and RESONANCE is his best collection yet.


Vengeful Hymns

Vengeful Hymns

By Marc J. Sheehan

Marc Sheehan’s poems are reflective, wry, and humble. They are also quietly stubborn and assertive. The humor in these poems hurts a little with their recognition of our own foibles and pure flat-out goofiness. Sheehan celebrates the good, ordinary, imperfect life full of improvisations, going through life on hunches and goodwill. His poems would break your heart if they weren’t so warm and funny, wistful and accepting.


Light Thickens

Light Thickens

By Elizabeth Biller Chapman

"Elizabeth...writes with vigor and soul -- her luminous poems shine like beacons.”


Now and Then: New and Selected Poems

Now and Then: New and Selected Poems

By Robert Phillips

"Robert Phillips is about the only living U.S. poet who never bores me."


Shimming the Glass House

Shimming the Glass House

By Helen Pruitt Wallace

Bronze Medal Winner in the 2008 Poetry Category of the Florida Book Awards Like Robert Frost's, these poems have a lover's quarrel with the world. Their words and music throw light over dark places, and find meanings and leanings in the smallest details. Helen Wallace's first book is a remarkably wise and moving collection.


Permanent Address

Permanent Address

By Lorna Knowles Blake

Lorna Knowles Blake is a poet who writes with elegance, wit and formal invention. Her subjects are love, marriage, family, and the kinds of commitment needed to sustain them. Reading her work, one sees again and again the contingencies of domestic life transformed by those rituals that give them place and permanence. Permanent Address is a wise and joyful collection by a poet of impressive accomplishment.


The Joyful Dark

The Joyful Dark

By Michael Miller

Very promising – in fact full of achievement. Michael Miller is able to express his experiences, his feelings, his longings, very sensuously and accurately.


Underwater Lengths in a Single Breath

Underwater Lengths in a Single Breath

By Benjamin S. Grossberg

Grossberg writes poems so well-fashioned they appear to have been wholly conceived. (“Artifice is our general burden,” quoth Amerigo Vespucci.) But radical too: in their erotic reveries, and with knowing sadness, the poems here take up classical matters anew and afresh. What a fine book, distinguished in these times for its historical reach and lyrical substance.


A Secret Room in Fall

A Secret Room in Fall

By Maria Terrone

Whether confronting heavy matters close to home and family, taking in gritty facets of the urban landscape, or bringing to sympathetic light anonymous, mainly female workers in the shadows and giving each her moment of perfectly articulated presence, Maria Terrone's poems are quietly insistent, recuperative acts of imagination. At times spiced by a wry humor, at times opening to small toughes of rapture ("I rise daily, a miracle"), A Secret Room in Fall suggests a world that is one "dense, resplendent cargo," of which the poet takes exacting, loving stock.


Crawlers

Crawlers

By Nathalie Anderson

The poems in Nathalie Anderson's Crawlers explore family, in its traditional sense and as a metaphor for the relationships of the world at large, mining dark and complicated truths. Anderson's imagery is densely beautiful, disarmingly rich. Hers is an expansive and generous poetry - desperately moving, meticulously crafted.


Remorseless Loyalty

Remorseless Loyalty

By Christine Gelineau

One of poetry's tasks is to encounter pain. Not to resolve it, not even to console it. But to encounter it with a language that will let it be known, and in this knowing some transformation, however small, may happen. The poems in Remorseless Loyalty bristle with such hard-won transformations.


Calling in the Bones

Calling in the Bones

By Carol Barrett

Carol Barrett's narratives document the suffering and fecundity of an ensemble cast: a mapmaker, a sleep technician, a man who would eat soap are only a few of the actors celebrated by this poet for their small acts of bravery in an all-too-human world.


The Housing

The Housing

By A.V. Christie

In beautiful and mysterious poems, many-layered and intricate like the anatomical drawings of Vesalius, A.V. Christie creates the housing for a metaphysical realm pulled back from some far-off dream. But looking closely, we can see it's our familiar world, exquisitely delineated: the shelter of marriage, family, dwelling, not to forget the body, our first and primary housing.


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